29: How I’ll Triple My Real Estate Production In 2015

January, 2015 will mark the beginning of my 3rd year as an agent in residential real estate.  And I plan to triple my real estate production from what I did in 2014.  Here’s how.

Prior to being an agent, I ran (and still own but have delegated the management of) a pet services company where we get 90% of all our new business from the internet.  And the majority of this new business comes to us for free without paid advertising.

In fact, one of the reasons I got into real estate was because I felt I could leverage what I learned in this other business to produce real estate leads.

Well, as it turns out, some of my internet magic works for real estate, but I learned that a lot of it doesn’t produce results in quite the same way.  So I had to look for new solutions to get buyer and seller leads.

how to increase real estate production
Over the last 2 years I’ve experimented in all types of ways with internet-based lead generation techniques.  As I start year 3, here’s what I’m going to focus on.

Note that none of what I’m doing is related to traditional techniques of cold calling, door knocking, farming with direct mail, open houses, or other typical activities.  Further, I’m also not using any pay-per-click systems related to getting buyer leads with IDX or anything like that.

I truly feel that there is a NEW way to do things in real estate.  And I’m doubling-down on my bet by forgetting about every traditional technique I’ve been taught.

This is all I’m doing for the next year.  And I think that this 4-part approach is going to work:

1.  Facebook Ads

Facebook Ads are not at all related to what we’ve traditionally learned about Facebook and social media.  To me, the social media component of posting stuff to my Facebook timeline and getting “likes” is a bottomless pit of effort with no real tangible return.

Facebook Ads, on the other hand, give very specific results.  I know that if I spend X dollars, I will get Y number of leads.  If I don’t get as many leads as I want, then I know I need to change some component of the advertisement or lead capture process.

I’ll be using the ads for 3 main types of campaigns:

  1. Ads to bring cold traffic to sign up for a webinar
  2. “Retargeting-Loop” Ads for warm traffic
  3. “Custom Audience” Ads for those very familiar with me

See below for more info on the Webinars.

If you’re not sure what “retargeting” is, it’s a way for you to target ads only to people who have already come to your website.  So, for example, I’m going to be running ads to drive cold traffic to my website for local market updates.  Once they’ve been to my site and have some familiarity with me, I’ll be running retargeting ads directly to those people to have them sign up for a webinar or get other valuable content from me that’s specific to their interest (location, seller, buyer, etc.)

If you’re not familiar with “custom audiences,” it’s a way for you to target people you already have on some type of list.  So, for example, I’ll be uploading my list of clients and then running ads to those people every so often to remind them of my services and to think of me for referrals.

2.  Webinars

Webinars are online presentations.  I conduct these at my computer in my office and webinar attendees can watch and listen from where ever they are via phone, tablet, or computer.  It’s very convenient and cost effective.

Why webinars?  Well, the short answer is that they’re a great way for prospects (who are typically complete strangers) to get to know me and understand that I know what I’m talking about.

With webinars, people can see me live on video, hear my voice, get a sense of my personality, and learn something – all at the same time.

Plus, if a prospect is wiling to spend 45 minutes online with me, don’t you think they’re probably more serious than someone who spends 5 seconds clicking a PPC ad to sign up to get emails of new homes?  You bet they are.  Webinar attendees are A-level prospects for sure!

My webinars will revolve around seller and buyer-related topics.

3. My Email List

My list of real estate prospects is a crucial component to my plan.  Since you need to constantly be in contact with people, an automated email campaign is a must-have system to have in place.  Often referred to as a “drip campaign,” my email list will receive short messages from me generally related to buyer and seller tips and tricks.

4.  Video Testimonials and Referrals

You can’t go wrong with referrals, of course.  I’m definitely going to be more conscious of asking people for referrals and staying in contact with past clients.

Further, I’m taking the typical testimonial and cranking it up a few notches by getting video testimonials.  I’ve been able to get about 9 so far this past year.  Not everyone is wiling to be on camera, but I’ve noticed that those who are will typically be very excited to talk about me and my services.

These videos get uploaded to my youtube channel and put on my website.

 

Would you like to see how my plan turns out?

Get regular updates from me.  Copy my ideas and learn from me regarding things that go right and what went wrong by getting on my email list right now.

My list gets regular updates on what I’m doing and exactly how I’m doing it.  Plus, I often interview top agents to learn their story of what they’ve done to make it big in real estate.

All this is free, so make sure to get on my email list by clicking here.

What about you?  I’d love to learn how you’re going to make 2015 the best year ever. Leave a comment below.  Thanks!

28: Why Providing Showing Feedback Is So Important

I timed myself as to how long it took to write feedback after a showing.  It took 14 seconds.

14 total seconds of my day.  That’s all.

Why is it then that only about a third of agents take the time to provide any type of feedback?  I don’t care if it’s a brief reply such as “interested” or “not interested”.  That at least gives me what I need to know.  Those simple words allow me to give my client some type of update.

Is it really that hard?  Does 10-30 seconds of time really cost that much?  Or is the effort just too great to reply to my email (or text or actually call me back after my 3rd inquiry about what the buyer thought).

real estate showing feedback
 

I think it’s reasonable that if a seller leaves their home for an hour on a Sunday morning to enable a buyer to visit, that the buyer’s agent will take 15 seconds to give an update afterwards.  Or am I totally out of line thinking this is logical?

Providing that feedback, as brief or in-depth as it may be, is so important because:

It Helps Show Our Clients That We Are Watching Out For Them – To sellers, getting feedback is common sense.  If we can’t get it, it makes us look like we’re not paying attention.  Or, worse, that we don’t know what we’re doing.

It Provides Direction – How do we know what to fix if we don’t know what’s broken?  Feedback gives an unbiased opinion of the property from an outsider.  Sellers are often way too attached to their home to see the faults.  When an outsider can point them out, it can help give credibility to needing to fix things that maybe the seller didn’t think were problems.

Pricing & Value – Although you have to expect that a serious buyer is probably going to provide feedback that the “price is too high,” other non-interested buyers will likely be giving you their honest opinion on if the price is at market value or not.  We all know that sellers think their house is more special than every other one on the block so, if 10 people are saying it’s priced too high, then maybe the seller will finally get the hint that their over-priced property needs to come down.

What Goes Around, Comes Around – As agents, we have an informal brother/sisterhood, right?  We have to watch out for each other.  I’m a believer that what goes around, comes around.  So, providing feedback to others is the best way for you to get feedback of your own when you need it.

The next time you visit a home as a buyer’s agent, make sure to provide feedback within 24 hours.  We all help each other, don’t we?

 

 

27: When Should You Ask For Time From A Real Estate Prospect?

I’m not sure what it was about these past 2 weeks, but I’ve received an abnormal number of calls and emails from complete stranger salespeople asking me for my time.

The last email was especially egregious and began like this…

“Hey John – I know you’re crazy busy, but I’m looking to grab 20-30 minutes of your time for a quick call/screen share sometime in the next few weeks to show you our software system…”

On a side note, this person also emailed me 3 more times to follow up.  Each email was sent at exactly the same time of day, which is clearly a sign that I was on an auto-emailing system and not even being contacted by a real person.

real estate prospect time
Anyway, back to his initial email.  The first note this guy sends me is nothing but a request for my time.  I’ve never heard from him before and there was zero attempt to understand what I might need (which, by the way, is definitely not related to what he’s selling).

He’s just asking for something from me and offering zero value in return.  And, by the way, he’s not asking for something tiny.  He wants up to 30 minutes of time (or more).  This got me thinking about when it’s reasonable to ask for my real estate prospects’ time.

I considered that it might be after “x” number of contacts or “y” number of days.  However, what I think it really comes down to is that:

It’s acceptable and reasonable to ask for a prospect’s time after you’ve already provided them with some type of value first.

I don’t think there’ necessarily a specific timeline attached to value.  If I conduct a webinar with a solid 45 minutes of solid educational material, I think it’s reasonable to ask for someone’s time after that even if it’s the first day of my relationship with this person.

I believe that the response you get to asking someone for their time is more related to the strength of the value you’ve provided to them rather than the length of time you may have been in contact with them.

There are a lot of people that are in my database that I’ve “checked in” with for over a year.  That’s a pretty long time.  But, if I haven’t really provided them with any type of value over that period, I shouldn’t expect them to want to suddenly do business with me just because they’ve been on my list for a while.

As a real estate agent, I’m going to think a lot more about the value I can provide to people over the course of the coming year.  If I provide something that’s tangible and educational to them that helps them achieve their goals, I think that is completely deserving of them giving me 15 or 30 or 60 minutes of time when it makes sense to meet up.

Thank you, Mr. Email Guy who rudely asked me for my most precious asset, my time, without offering something in return.  It was a great reminder as to how I should attempt to be in contact with my own prospects.

No matter how long or short of a time I’ve known someone who’s looking to buy or sell, it’s my goal to consistently provide amazing value along the way.  Do that and I think you can ask for as much time as you want of someone.

How about you?  When do you think it’s reasonable to ask for someone’s time?  I know some great sales people who are very direct and cut right to the chase and successfully contradict my entire article.  Are you more of a “value mindset” like me or do you charge right in?  Let me know in the comments.

 

26: Is Being A Real Estate Agent Fun?

As a former recruiter helping people find jobs, I met with people every single day and listened to their story of why they wanted to change jobs and what they were looking for in a new one.  There were always the necessities of what people had to have, such as a certain salary or job location.

But, when it came down to it, what I found most people really wanted in their job was simply to be interested in it.  They wanted to like their jobs and not dread the 8-10 hours a day they were putting in.

In other words, most people just wanted to have a little fun in their jobs.

If you’re thinking of becoming a real estate agent, you’re probably wondering how you might like this type of role and if you’d have any fun doing it.  So here are some things you should consider regarding what being a real estate agent entails.  If you don’t think these types of activities are fun, then you probably won’t think being an agent is very fun, either.

real estate agent fun
 

1.  Love Helping People

Being a real estate agent is WAY TOO HARD if you don’t enjoy the aspect of helping people.  If you’re in it strictly for the money, you’re probably not going to put in the amount of time and effort that is required when things get tough.

For example, when a deal is headed south, when negotiations seemingly come to a stand-still, when your client unpredictably changes his mind, or when you get an “urgent” call at 10:30pm on a Saturday night, it’s often hard to see the light at the end of the tunnel.  But knowing that your actions will help your clients is often the motivation that will keep you going.

2.  Thrive On Pressure

When you’re dealing with customers who are spending all the money they can afford (no matter if that’s tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands, or millions), they expect you to make things happen the way that they want them to.  There’s a ton of pressure when your client expects you to sell for way more than the market will bear, when your client wants that 600K home for 500K, and when the inevitable unexpected wrench in the works pops up in the middle of the deal.

If you don’t love pressure and people relying on you, real estate is not going to be fun.

3.  Work Independently

Some people can work independently without supervision and some can’t.  There’s no right or wrong if you’re one or the other.  But you need to recognize which you are.

If you’re not fully able to get out of bed in the morning and do what you need to do with the proper priority without someone watching over you and making you do it, each day is going to be tough for you.

4.  Run A Business

Yes, you’re a real estate agent.  But, you’re also more than that.  You’re also a full-fledged business and you need to think about operations, marketing, accounting, client relations, customer follow up, goal-setting, prospecting, and a ton more.

If you are looking for a 9-5 job where you can clock in and then clock out and forget about the day, then being a real estate agent may not be very fun.

5.  Prospect For New Business

If an agent is going to fail, it’s probably because of a lack of prospecting.  The bottom line in being a real estate agent is that you need to always be hunting for your next deal.  It’s how you put food on the table.

If you’re afraid of reaching out to new people or, worse, you found this type of activity to be downright dreadful, then being a real estate agent surely is not going to be fun.

Remember that different agents to all types of different kinds of prospecting and you don’t have to love every type.  For example, I hate cold-calling people primarily because I did that for about a decade in my recruiting job.  I just don’t love that type of outreach.  However, I am all about digital and online farming and prospecting.  That’s what interests me and that’s what I’m good at.

You couldn’t pay me to pick up the phone and dial for dollars, but I love putting together facebook ads and doing webinars.  That’s the type of prospecting I do and how I get a lot of my business.  To me, that’s fun.  If you have some type of prospecting that you consider fun, then you’ll have a much better chance to succeed in this business.

How about you?  If you’re thinking of becoming a real estate agent, which of these 5 topics do you think you’d have the most fun with?  If you’re a current agent, what else do you think you need to consider for real estate to be a fun job?

 

25: How Hard Should You Push In A Listing Presentation?

The ultimate goal of a listing presentation is to get a home seller to list with you, of course.  But, during the meeting with the home owner, how hard should you push him/her/them towards that goal?

In my last meeting with a home owner the other day, I left without a listing agreement.  I probably could have pushed harder.  However, the listing wasn’t my absolute goal for that particular meeting.  My goal was something else.

This particular seller was a brand new prospect to me.  She had signed up for one of my webinars from a facebook ad I was running.  She attended the webinar and spent about 46 minutes listening to me talk about how she should go about selling her home with “best practices” in mind.

listing presentation pressure
 

Since she had attended the webinar, I really didn’t need to go through a typical “listing presentation” at her home because she was already familiar with me and my approach.  This, of course, is the whole point of the webinar – to build that initial level of trust that I know what I’m talking about.

During the course of some follow up with her after the webinar, I learned via email that she had tried to sell about 6 months ago and had gone through a horrific experience with a real estate agent.  Unsurprisingly, she was very weary of agents.  I was able to arrange a phone conversation to discuss this in more detail and that turned into an invitation to meet up in person.

This brings me back to the point of what my goal was for this meeting:

To establish trust, not necessarily get a listing.

Based on the fact that I knew that she wants to sell but had no intention to try to list for another 10 weeks (based on the season) and that she had a terrible experience with another agent and that, when I met up with her she was in the midst of baking cookies for Christmas, I didn’t want to push too hard.  I just wanted to establish trust.  I don’t think she was in the right mindset to commit to me – or anyone else for that matter.   I think if I would have gone in with the clear intent to have her sign on the dotted line, it would have backfired.

But, what if she lists with someone else?

Well, although she said she had one other agent to talk with, she was not seemingly “shopping” the best price or giving other indications that she’s got a gazillion other agents to interview.  If it’s me and one other person, I’m down for a shootout between myself and them.

With all this in mind, what I did at the end of the conversation with her (which was 75 minutes long) was set up another appointment to come back and to bring a very firm selling price with me.

I did this so that I could have more facetime with this seller.  It allows me another chance to be in front of her to further show  that I can be the right choice for them.  In the meantime, I’m sure we’ll have another 2 or 3 emails and maybe another phone call.  That all adds up to about 7-10 total points of contact before I go and visit a second time.

So, how hard have I pushed so far and how hard will I push in the future?  Well, I don’t think I’m pushing very hard at all in this case.  I truly feel that the tortoise will win this race.  I just have to stay in contact and keep demonstrating a high level of expertise.  I guess a die-hard salesperson could have gone in for the one-meeting listing appointment, but I really think that would have been a tough road on this one.

I really enjoyed meeting with this home owner and I think she’ll be a good client.  When you help people that you want to work with, they often end up choosing you without any sales games.

And, usually, it’s because they didn’t feel pushed into it.

What about you?  How hard do you “push” in a listing presentation?  Leave a comment below and let us know.

24: Top 7 Ways To Improve Your Real Estate Facebook Ad Conversion

There are 10 gazillion facebook ads competing for your attention every time you visit their site.  Well, maybe it’s not quite that many, but it’s a lot, to be sure.

With that much competition, it’s imperative that you create ads that have a super-strong call-to-action so you can increase your conversion rate of your real estate ads.

What’s a “call-to-action” you ask?  Well, it’s basically the request that you’re making of the viewer.  Maybe you want them to sign up for something, download a free report, or take some other action.

When you’ve got a great call-to-action, the conversion rate of your ad goes up.  So, here are the top 7 ways to increase the effectiveness of your ad and drive that conversion higher and higher.

tips to increase facebook ad conversion rate
 

1.  Inspire Action

The whole point of your facebook ad is to get your prospect to take some type of action, right?  So, the very first thing any ad must accomplish is to tell the prospect exactly what it is that you want them to do next.

Use words that inspire and propel action.  Examples of these types of words include:  register, download, attend, visit, sign up, call, email, click, etc.

For example, if  you were trying to get someone to sign up for a webinar on home selling, your ad might say:

  • “Register for our Home Seller 101 webinar.  Click here to sign up.”

2.  Be Direct

People on facebook are in a passive state of mind.  They’re not looking for your real estate services.  So, you must be direct in what you are asking of them so they don’t have to think about it too hard.

If you want them to download a free home buyer checklist, be direct and say “Download this homebuyer checklist.”  Don’t confuse your prospect by sugar-coating your words and trying to make your offer sound fancier than it really is.  Just get to the point and make your call-to-action as direct as possible.

3.  Add A Deadline

When people are faced with a limited-time offer, they’re forced to make a decision or lose out.  So, adding a deadline and creating a sense of urgency helps people make their decision sooner rather than later (and hopefully they will decide right then and there).

If you’re advertising an open house, you have urgency built into the ad because there is a very specific time and date of the event.  If you’re advertising a webinar, again, you have a specific time and date and you could also throw in “limited space available.”

4.  Make It Free

Whatever it is you’re offering in your facebook ad, make it free.  Everyone loves free stuff.

Examples include:  Free home buyer checklist, Free webinar, Free home seller net sheet, Free list of local lenders/inspectors, etc.

You’re trying to increase your conversion rate, so don’t put a price on anything at the beginning.  Make your offer “free” and you’ll reduce the friction your prospect has to giving you their contact info.

5.  Introduce a Fear Factor

I don’t generally sell “fear” to my clients, but introducing a small bit of a “fear factor” can make a difference to some people.  No one wants to make a mistake, especially people who have already had a bad experience with a real estate agent or who have been involved with a real estate deal gone wrong.

Effective headlines that have a bit of fear built in include:  “don’t hire the wrong real estate agent”, “will your house ever sell?”, and “are you paying too much for your house?”

6.  Be Brief

Related to point #2 above, your ads should be brief as well as be direct.

No one is going to read a novel-length advertisement in their newsfeed.  So, your ad needs to be short and to the point.  It’s a mistake to try and warm people up with a bunch of copy before making your call-to-action pitch.  No one cares what you have to say.  Get right to the point and be brief.

7.  Use A Testimonial

One really cool thing about facebook is that it will essentially add testimonials to your ads for you.  For instance, if you’re advertising to a pool of people and a friend of someone in that pool has liked your ad, it will say “Sally Jenkins Likes This.”

But you don’t want to leave the testimonial piece entirely in facebook’s hands.  Instead, you can proactively highlight testimonials by including them in your ad.

Maybe you’ve got a high-profile client that is letting you use their image for your ad.  Or, more likely, you’re using a local client who has given you permission to use their picture or video for your marketing purposes.

Testimonials and recommendations can often help strangers trust you just that little bit extra to send them over the edge and take you up on your call-to-action request.

Summary

There is an art and a science to increasing your facebook ad conversion rate.  Use these tips and see your real estate ads perform better.

 

 

 

23: Why You Shouldn’t Trick Your Real Estate Prospects

So I get a call the other day from one of the big internet portal sites.  And they tricked me.

Here’s how they did it and why it makes me think less of them now.  Here’s also why I think we as agents should avoid this same type of behavior.

I was in a zone where I was getting things done and generally avoiding all other interruptions for a while (no email, phone, texts, etc.).  But my phone rang with the caller ID showing my local area code.  So, figuring it had a greater opportunity to be a real connection of mine than one that came from 10 states away, I picked up the phone.

23 home portal trick
 

“Hey John – this is Sammy from homeportalsite.com” (obviously, fake name and domain used here).  With a super-energetic voice, she proclaimed “I finally have zip code areas available for you to advertise in.  They’re in really high demand and they just opened up, so I wanted to give you the first opportunity at them.”

I’m not sure why anything in high-demand needs sales people to cold call you about it, but that’s a story for a different time.

Anyway, it was a short conversation as I explained that I do my own marketing.  But before the call ended, I remembered that the caller ID was from my own town so I asked “when did you get an office in Naperville?”

Her response was the basis for this whole article.

She said “oh, we don’t have an office there.  It’s just that our phone system creates a calller-ID number from the location where we’re calling to.  It’s helps in getting our calls answered.”

First, bravo for using technology in a creative way.

Second, I view this particular creative implementation of technology to be a trick.  Had I known who it was – or who it might have been – I wouldn’t have picked up the phone.

This, of course, is why they use it.  Because they know that I wouldn’t have answered the phone if it was a sales pitch for something that few people want.

This feeling of being tricked got me a bit frustrated.  The call was a waste of my time and, further, it makes me think even less of this company now because I know that their product is of so little value to most people that they have to come up with inventive ways to connect with me just to beg for my attention.

This got me thinking about the value that I provide to people:  

Is what I do of so little value that I have to trick people into talking with me?

I’m working hard to make sure that it isn’t.

I understand that prospecting is essential to stay alive in real estate.  I know that not everyone is going to want to hear from me at all times.  And I know that some people will see or hear me and think “oh great, another cheesy real estate agent” and not give me the benefit of the doubt.

But I also know that I’m not going to trick people into talking with me.

I feel that what I do has strong enough value that, if you’re in the market to be buying or selling, then you won’t be offended if I contact you in a straight-forward and transparent manner.  And I think we’re in a day and age where consumers are absolutely repelled by anything that has the slightest hint of shady sales tactics.

People don’t want to be tricked.  They have very limited time and so it requires us to up our game to make sure that when we do connect with them, they feel good about us when the conversation ends.

What do you think?  Is this just an arrogant rant or do you think that it’s right and good to employ any and every way to connect with possible new prospects, even if the method is a little devious?

Let me know in the comments below.

22: How To Earn Clients By Finding A Need And Then Filling It – Barry Burnett

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Summary

Learn how Barry Burnett sees opportunity everywhere and creates business where there was none before.

Barry Burnett RealtorProfile

Agent:  Barry Burnett

Real Estate Market: Burbank, CA.  Roughly $600K-$1M average sale

Steal His Ideas:

  • Give, give, give
  • Find a need and then fill it
  • Earn clients
  • Be brave enough to ask for the referrals you deserve
  • Ask, ask, and ask some more
  • Love what you do and be passionate about your efforts

Strategies

Starting on his first day when his boss said “here’s the desk, here’s the phone, welcome to the business, you’re on your own…and I’m not kidding”, Barry has gone on to be extremely successful selling homes over the last 4 decades.  Here’s a summary of how he did it.

Find and Fill

His overall strategy is to “find a need, then fill that need.”  If you stay focused on that, it will keep you busy forever.

But where do you find the needs?  Well, you have to look hard.  Think around the corners and look past the edges.  For example, if you’re looking at FSBOs, examine the copy that the home owner has written.  What is their need?  Obviously they need to sell their house, but what is beyond that?  Do they need to sell soon?  For a certain amount of money?  What is the need that you can notice that others have passed by?

Client Specialist

My first question to Barry was “how do you get clients?”  His simple answer was “earn them.”

I love that.

He goes on to say that he’s a “client specialist” and not a specialist of any particular type of geographic area or a property type.  He works with clients and ASKS how he can help them.

22 find fill need
 

Have Passion

“I don’t do real estate as a job.  I do it as a lifestyle and I consider it a participation sport.”

You have to love what you do.  At 4 decades into the business, Barry still works 11-14 hours a day.  That’s because he loves what he does.  He gives and gives and gives some more to his clients.  Because they know he is genuine and is giving to give (and not giving to get), they feel excited to help him back.  Mostly, that’s with referrals.

Ask, Ask, Ask

He is not shy about asking for referrals – as long as you’ve earned the right to do so.  There is no set schedule he goes by.  No planned attack.  He just asks.  Again, he just asks.  And, often, he gets.

Further, he recommends sending out “seasonally appropriate” information.  Like a local football schedule in the fall or tax tips at the beginning of the new year.

Marketing Vs. Selling

“Seasonally appropriate” information is marketing. It gets your name out there.  But, marketing doesn’t close deals.

So, you have to be able to sell, too.  Marketing is reminder of who you are and selling is the “ask” to see if you can create and facilitate a deal.

His Radio Show

Barry has a real estate-related show on a radio station.  He provides real estate investing advice.  He doesn’t do it to necessarily build his business.  He does it to provide accurate and helpful information.  But, of course, this translates into creating authority and trust in his skills and experience.

Lightning Round

What’s the worst marketing/prospecting/sales tactics you’ve done that others should avoid:  Don’t convince your clients to buy your passion.  Instead, help them to achieve theirs.  Also, be prepared to do everyone’s job, not just your own.

What keeps you motivated:  the constant hunt to find a need and then fill it.

You’ve got 30 days and $1000, what do you do:  knock on doors where ever people are (at businesses, out shopping, etc) because they’re often not at home

How You Can Do What He’s Done

Barry’s plan of attack is simple.  He is genuine, straightforward, and gives, gives, and gives some more.  By being passionate about the help he is providing, he is confident and diligent in asking for referrals.  And, of course, he gets them.

You don’t have to have a fancy radio show to build an audience.  You just have to love what you do and provide authentic and valuable information.  From there, your audience will grow all by itself.

More about Barry can be found on his website and his radio show.