29: How I’ll Triple My Real Estate Production In 2015

January, 2015 will mark the beginning of my 3rd year as an agent in residential real estate.  And I plan to triple my real estate production from what I did in 2014.  Here’s how.

Prior to being an agent, I ran (and still own but have delegated the management of) a pet services company where we get 90% of all our new business from the internet.  And the majority of this new business comes to us for free without paid advertising.

In fact, one of the reasons I got into real estate was because I felt I could leverage what I learned in this other business to produce real estate leads.

Well, as it turns out, some of my internet magic works for real estate, but I learned that a lot of it doesn’t produce results in quite the same way.  So I had to look for new solutions to get buyer and seller leads.

how to increase real estate production
Over the last 2 years I’ve experimented in all types of ways with internet-based lead generation techniques.  As I start year 3, here’s what I’m going to focus on.

Note that none of what I’m doing is related to traditional techniques of cold calling, door knocking, farming with direct mail, open houses, or other typical activities.  Further, I’m also not using any pay-per-click systems related to getting buyer leads with IDX or anything like that.

I truly feel that there is a NEW way to do things in real estate.  And I’m doubling-down on my bet by forgetting about every traditional technique I’ve been taught.

This is all I’m doing for the next year.  And I think that this 4-part approach is going to work:

1.  Facebook Ads

Facebook Ads are not at all related to what we’ve traditionally learned about Facebook and social media.  To me, the social media component of posting stuff to my Facebook timeline and getting “likes” is a bottomless pit of effort with no real tangible return.

Facebook Ads, on the other hand, give very specific results.  I know that if I spend X dollars, I will get Y number of leads.  If I don’t get as many leads as I want, then I know I need to change some component of the advertisement or lead capture process.

I’ll be using the ads for 3 main types of campaigns:

  1. Ads to bring cold traffic to sign up for a webinar
  2. “Retargeting-Loop” Ads for warm traffic
  3. “Custom Audience” Ads for those very familiar with me

See below for more info on the Webinars.

If you’re not sure what “retargeting” is, it’s a way for you to target ads only to people who have already come to your website.  So, for example, I’m going to be running ads to drive cold traffic to my website for local market updates.  Once they’ve been to my site and have some familiarity with me, I’ll be running retargeting ads directly to those people to have them sign up for a webinar or get other valuable content from me that’s specific to their interest (location, seller, buyer, etc.)

If you’re not familiar with “custom audiences,” it’s a way for you to target people you already have on some type of list.  So, for example, I’ll be uploading my list of clients and then running ads to those people every so often to remind them of my services and to think of me for referrals.

2.  Webinars

Webinars are online presentations.  I conduct these at my computer in my office and webinar attendees can watch and listen from where ever they are via phone, tablet, or computer.  It’s very convenient and cost effective.

Why webinars?  Well, the short answer is that they’re a great way for prospects (who are typically complete strangers) to get to know me and understand that I know what I’m talking about.

With webinars, people can see me live on video, hear my voice, get a sense of my personality, and learn something – all at the same time.

Plus, if a prospect is wiling to spend 45 minutes online with me, don’t you think they’re probably more serious than someone who spends 5 seconds clicking a PPC ad to sign up to get emails of new homes?  You bet they are.  Webinar attendees are A-level prospects for sure!

My webinars will revolve around seller and buyer-related topics.

3. My Email List

My list of real estate prospects is a crucial component to my plan.  Since you need to constantly be in contact with people, an automated email campaign is a must-have system to have in place.  Often referred to as a “drip campaign,” my email list will receive short messages from me generally related to buyer and seller tips and tricks.

4.  Video Testimonials and Referrals

You can’t go wrong with referrals, of course.  I’m definitely going to be more conscious of asking people for referrals and staying in contact with past clients.

Further, I’m taking the typical testimonial and cranking it up a few notches by getting video testimonials.  I’ve been able to get about 9 so far this past year.  Not everyone is wiling to be on camera, but I’ve noticed that those who are will typically be very excited to talk about me and my services.

These videos get uploaded to my youtube channel and put on my website.

 

Would you like to see how my plan turns out?

Get regular updates from me.  Copy my ideas and learn from me regarding things that go right and what went wrong by getting on my email list right now.

My list gets regular updates on what I’m doing and exactly how I’m doing it.  Plus, I often interview top agents to learn their story of what they’ve done to make it big in real estate.

All this is free, so make sure to get on my email list by clicking here.

What about you?  I’d love to learn how you’re going to make 2015 the best year ever. Leave a comment below.  Thanks!

25: How Hard Should You Push In A Listing Presentation?

The ultimate goal of a listing presentation is to get a home seller to list with you, of course.  But, during the meeting with the home owner, how hard should you push him/her/them towards that goal?

In my last meeting with a home owner the other day, I left without a listing agreement.  I probably could have pushed harder.  However, the listing wasn’t my absolute goal for that particular meeting.  My goal was something else.

This particular seller was a brand new prospect to me.  She had signed up for one of my webinars from a facebook ad I was running.  She attended the webinar and spent about 46 minutes listening to me talk about how she should go about selling her home with “best practices” in mind.

listing presentation pressure
 

Since she had attended the webinar, I really didn’t need to go through a typical “listing presentation” at her home because she was already familiar with me and my approach.  This, of course, is the whole point of the webinar – to build that initial level of trust that I know what I’m talking about.

During the course of some follow up with her after the webinar, I learned via email that she had tried to sell about 6 months ago and had gone through a horrific experience with a real estate agent.  Unsurprisingly, she was very weary of agents.  I was able to arrange a phone conversation to discuss this in more detail and that turned into an invitation to meet up in person.

This brings me back to the point of what my goal was for this meeting:

To establish trust, not necessarily get a listing.

Based on the fact that I knew that she wants to sell but had no intention to try to list for another 10 weeks (based on the season) and that she had a terrible experience with another agent and that, when I met up with her she was in the midst of baking cookies for Christmas, I didn’t want to push too hard.  I just wanted to establish trust.  I don’t think she was in the right mindset to commit to me – or anyone else for that matter.   I think if I would have gone in with the clear intent to have her sign on the dotted line, it would have backfired.

But, what if she lists with someone else?

Well, although she said she had one other agent to talk with, she was not seemingly “shopping” the best price or giving other indications that she’s got a gazillion other agents to interview.  If it’s me and one other person, I’m down for a shootout between myself and them.

With all this in mind, what I did at the end of the conversation with her (which was 75 minutes long) was set up another appointment to come back and to bring a very firm selling price with me.

I did this so that I could have more facetime with this seller.  It allows me another chance to be in front of her to further show  that I can be the right choice for them.  In the meantime, I’m sure we’ll have another 2 or 3 emails and maybe another phone call.  That all adds up to about 7-10 total points of contact before I go and visit a second time.

So, how hard have I pushed so far and how hard will I push in the future?  Well, I don’t think I’m pushing very hard at all in this case.  I truly feel that the tortoise will win this race.  I just have to stay in contact and keep demonstrating a high level of expertise.  I guess a die-hard salesperson could have gone in for the one-meeting listing appointment, but I really think that would have been a tough road on this one.

I really enjoyed meeting with this home owner and I think she’ll be a good client.  When you help people that you want to work with, they often end up choosing you without any sales games.

And, usually, it’s because they didn’t feel pushed into it.

What about you?  How hard do you “push” in a listing presentation?  Leave a comment below and let us know.